Medlibs Chat: Presidential Priorities, I Have No Priorities

Join us tomorrow (6:00pm Pacific / 9:00pm Eastern) on the #medlibs chat as I try to successfully balance watching the Cavs in the NBA playoffs and moderating the discussion on the changes happening within MLA, specifically the MLA strategic plan.

(reposted from #medlibs chat blog)

In the past each MLA President has presented their list of priorities for the upcoming year for MLA.  This year is a little different. I have no priorities.  OK, that sounds a lot different. But it really isn’t.  Instead of coming up with priorities each year the incoming president will look at MLA’s strategic plan and evaluate the goals within the plan.  If we are near accomplishing a goal, then the incoming president looks at other potential goals that we should add to the strategic plan. The idea is that these goals live long enough for accomplishment and are not specifically tied to the president’s term. They are part of the entire MLA strategic plan which is tied to MLA, the board, staff, etc. As in the case of MLA’s technology goal, a goal could be accomplished in less than a year.  In the case of the Education goal, it may take more than a year.  However, steps toward accomplishing that goal will be continually happening.

Speaking of continually happening… In years prior the time line for getting things done always seemed to be centered around the meeting in May.  Why? There are probably a lot of reasons, but I think (total guess on my part) is that it is a legacy of when we (librarians) did less business electronically.  We live in a time of email and other forms of online communication. Now days things can happen faster because we can communicate more easily and more often. We agree to take on projects at MLA then scurry around next March/April to make sure something was accomplished before the meeting again in May. We don’t even read and approve the prior meetings minutes until a year later at the next meeting. This has given us the nimbleness of an AT-AT in regards to change.

We need to look at ways to speed up processes and work towards the evolution of our organization as well as the groups (Sections, SIGs, Committees, etc.) within our organization.  So this Twitter chat will focus on ways that we as a group can work toward improving the speed at which we accomplish things.  Because waiting a year to approve something makes any organization sluggish and less adaptable to responsive change.

What are your ideas for making us more nimble?

Come share your thoughts and perspectives! Never participated in a #medlibs or other Twitter chat before? Check out this overview and come on in, we’re a supportive community and are especially keeping an eye out to welcome and support your participation if you’ve just heard about this community for the first time during the meeting.

 

 

Join the #medlibs Discussion on 2016 Meeting Changes

Join us tonight May 7, 2015 at 6pm Pacific/9pm Eastern for a chat on Twitter regarding changes to the 2016 Annual Meeting and brainstorming what changes we could do for future meetings.
(reposted from #medlibs chat blog)
The 2016 meeting will be in Toronto and will be a joint conference with CHLA-ABSC and the International Clinical Librarian Conference (ICLC).  This gives us the perfect opportunity to work with the conference structure and see where we can make some changes that better fit the needs of members.  The Futures Task Force listed several suggestions for changing the annual meeting.  So tune in to the chat this Thursday May 7, 2015 at 6pm Pacific/9pm Eastern to learn about some of the changes that will be happening.  Also help us brainstorm any changes that we can work on for future meetings.  Just like Rome was not built in a day, planning a conference takes years. So some great ideas may take a while to get in the system but we are listening.

Get to Know the New Executive Director of MLA

Kevin Baliozian, the new Executive Director of MLA, has graciously agreed to be the special guest for the weekly #medlibs Twitter chat the evening of Thursday, April 16. The chat starts at 9:00 PM Eastern / 8:00 PM Central / 7:00 PM Mountain / 6:00 PM Pacific. Teresa Knott and I are regular participants; we agreed to facilitate the chat. Information about the chat is outlined in a blog post at http://medlibschat.blogspot.com/. If you want to get a feel for how conversations flow, please take a look at the transcripts from the previous chats.

If you are interested, please join us. You’ll need a Twitter account. Typically, I use TweetChat.com when chatting in Twitter since it groups all the tweets with the same hashtag (#medlibs) into the same room. In addition, if you tweet into the room, the chat box automatically adds the #medlibs Twitter hashtag so your tweets are seen by chat participants.

If you have any questions, please let me know. Hope you can join us!  Lurkers are welcome too!

Wanted: Librarians With Good IT Relationships and Knowledge

The Southeastern/Atlantic (SE/A) Technology Program Advisory Committee (PAC) has been outlining their goals for the coming year to try and best to meet the needs of their members. One of the Tech PAC’s multi-year goals (based on the results of the survey given in 2012), is to address technology issues some librarians face daily professional lives.  They are planning a series of webinars on the topic and they need your help.

The first webinar will address relationship-building between libraries and the technology departments which support them.They would like to feature the partnerships of one or more librarians and their tech people on the webinar.  So if you are BFF’s with your tech people or just merely have a good working relationship then they would like to use you to serve as models for the medical library community.  **Krafty Note** HOSPITAL LIBRARIANS….You are especially important in this area. Many hospital IT department have vastly different and considerably more strict policies than academic institutions which sometime make being a librarian’s job more difficult. So if you are a hospital librarian with a good working relationship with your IT people, then please, please, please consider contacting the Tech PAC.

The second webinar in the series is tentatively titled, “How to speak IT,” and will focus on defining and contextualizing basic IT terms. We know librarians have our own geek speak; ILL, PDA (not kissing), MeSH, etc. Well, IT has their own geek speak as well and if you two aren’t speaking the same geek it can make communicating a bit difficult at times. For example (not library related): A woman today told me my face look BEAT!  I was bummed. I was well rested (unusual when you have 3 kids) and I actually looked in the mirror and put on make up before I went to work. I thought I looked good.  The woman seeing my confusion said, “That’s a compliment. You look really good.”  She said that makeup artists and others use it to mean on how stunning somebody looks, especially their makeup.  I felt very happy…that is until I realized I am now so old that I don’t know what “kids” are saying these days.

The Tech PAC is looking for a good IT geek speak “explainer” who would be willing to participate as a speaker to help librarians out there speak a little IT geek speak. If your IT guy says to you, “A VLAN configuration issue has surfaced between our new Web app and the SQL back end,” and your brain translates it to, “The network configuration needs adjusting before we go live,” then Tech PAC wants you.

Finally, Tech Pac is also asking for ideas for future webinars and other programs based on librarian technology needs. So contact them via Twitter (@KR_Barker) or email (Grumpy_Cat [atsign] virginia.edu) if you have ideas or can help them with one of their two webinars.

Discussion About #Medlibs Discussion

Last week’s #medlibs chat was about conference codes of conduct and it was co-hosted with officers from the MLA Relevant Issues Sections.  http://bit.ly/1mkgcnB

I was on vacation when I participated in the chat so forgive me for the tardiness of this post.

Increasingly, professional and tech conferences are adopting anti-harassment policies and codes of conduct. The Relevant Issues Section of MLA would like to explore having one for MLA meetings.

 

For background, check out:

The discussion centered around previous incidents at library meetings (including MLA) where attendees felt harassed (by fellow librarians and/or vendors). The moderators asked the #medlibs participants about having a code of conduct at MLA meetings.  It was noted that some speakers no longer will speak at meeting without a code of conduct policy and that those who have been harassed need to know they can report problems.

For some reason the code of conduct discussion slid into a discussion about breast feeding at meetings and the need for child care at meetings.  I can kind of see how the topic of breast feeding sort of made it in the discussion because that could be something is harassed about.  However the issue of child care at the meetings was kind of out of left field for me given the pre-determined code of conduct topic.

There was a group of people who thought that MLA need to provide child care at the meetings for working single parents.  I did note that MLA usually includes information from the hotel on finding a sitter during the meeting. But, this was not what they meant, they wanted to child care.  While I am not a single parent, I do have three kids and those three kids were all in child care at one time and I can tell you first hand that it is flipping crazy expensive and I am living in Cleveland where our cost of living is pretty reasonable.  I can’t imagine the costs of providing child care at an annual meeting.  When I brought up the cost barrier there were some who thought we could get a vendor to sponsor it or that we could add it to the cost of registration. (The registration aspect confused me, I wasn’t sure if they meant the person who selected it paid or if it was spread across the entire registrants to supplement those who needed it.) After being on two NPCs and fundraising for one of them, I personally don’t see a vendor paying for it.  It took a lot of work to get the conference wide wifi to get paid for.

So my questions for you, readers…..

  • What are your thoughts on a code of conduct policy for MLA meetings?
  • What happens if somebody violates the code of conduct? (Are there teeth to the policy?)
  • Is child care needed at MLA’s annual meeting and how should it be paid for?
  • Instead of having official MLA child care, is there a better child care option for single parents to attend meeting other than the hotel babysitter info that is provided?
  • What about the MLA online annual meeting conference package? Would that help single parents who couldn’t travel to the meeting?

I look forward to your thoughts and comments and don’t forget to join tonight’s #medlibs chat.  The chat will be open mic (meaning no moderator?) on whether existing CE meets what we need for research http://bit.ly/1lzS8h3.

Become an Embase Screener

The Cochrane Collaboration is looking for people to help identify reports of randomized control trials (RCTs) and quasi-RCTs from Embase for publication in the Cochrane Central Register of Controlled Trials (CENTRAL).

The Cochrane Collaboration wants to develop and implement a screening task that is crowd sourced.  A web-based screening tool has already been created.  No prior experience is necessary.  “A quality-control system has been developed so that all records will be viewd by at least two screeners. Records viewed by ‘novice’ screeners will need three consecutive agreements on the record’s relevance for it to then be either published in CENTRAL or ‘rejected.”

This project has been designed to work with people’s “busy lives” in much the same way as other crowd-sourced endeavors.

For more information go to http://bit.ly/1hrI9qX

 

Hospitals Still on Windows XP Could Mean Loss of HIPAA Compliance

Roughly two weeks ago MLA released a new version of its website.  Right away librarians stuck (due to institutional standards) on IE 8 started complaining that the new MLA site did not display properly on IE 8.  The good news is that the folks at MLA know of this problem and are working with the web developer to fix it and others.  The bad news….the number of librarians stuck on IE 8 might be indicate a bigger problem for hospitals as a whole.  My guess (and this is totally hypothetical) is that a many people who are stuck on IE 8 are stuck because they can’t upgrade to IE 9+ because they are on Windows XP.

My husband works for a company that creates an enterprise content management software system that is used by over 1,500 healthcare provider organizations representing more than 2,500 facilities.  Sometimes our jobs deal with similar issues, sometimes they do not.  This is one of those times that they did.  I happened to mention the whole IE 8 problem with my husband and I think I started to see smoke billow out of his ears.  Since the kids were already asleep for the night, I figured I touched on a hot topic.  He told me that this has been a big problem in healthcare and banking for several years.  Many of the hospitals running IE 8 are also the same organizations that are still running Windows XP.  (While IE 8 can run on Windows 7, IE 9+ cannot run on Windows XP.)  Not only did his company decide to stop supporting XP they recently decided to no longer support IE 8.

Windows XP is NOT supported by Microsoft. Being on Windows XP is a security risk.  Just yesterday the Wall Street Journal, reported on a newly discovered security hole in Internet Explorer versions 6-11 in the article “New Browser Hole Poses Extra Danger for XP Users.” According to the article the “coding flaw would allow hackers to have the same level access on a network computer as the official user.”  Yeah I echo the WSJ in saying “that’s really bad.”  Microsoft is working on a fix, but that fix will not be available to XP users.  The Forbes article title “Microsoft Races To Fix Massive Internet Explorer Hack: No Fix For Windows XP Leaves 1 In 4 PCs Exposed,” pretty much says it all.  A 13 year old operating system still represents 25% of the world’s PCs.  The cyber security software company, FireEye,  revealed a “hacker group has already been exploiting the flaw in a campaign dubbed  ‘Operation Clandestine Fox’, which targets US military and financial institutions.”  While the WSJ article says FireEye said attacks were mainly targeted at IE 9-11, this security flaw is still a major problem specifically because Microsoft will not offer a patch for XP.  Basically once Windows Vista, 7 and 8 machines are patched….what system is left to hack? One that doesn’t even have a patch and users refuse to upgrade.

It isn’t like the XP rug was pulled out from under users.  On the contrary, XP users have know for 2 yrs that XP would be unsupported.  According Forbes, Microsoft “repeatedly sent a pop-up dialog box to reachable Windows XP machines” with end of support information.  Software developers including my husband’s company have warned customers that XP will no longer be supported by Microsoft and as a result they will no longer write software for XP nor support software on XP machines.  My husband told me how they have contacted their hospital clients of regarding XP yet the clients haven’t upgraded nor have any real plans to upgrade immediately.

So we get the fact that have a operating system that is no longer support is bad and could lead to security problems.  But when your a hospital and the security of patient information is paramount to your existence, second only to treating patients, then you have a major problem. The HIPAA Security Rule section 164.308(a)(5)(ii)(B), organizations with sensitive personal health information are required to protect their systems from  malicious software.

Several articles have stated that failure to upgrade from Window XP is a violation of HIPAA.

Mike Semel’s article states, “Just having a Windows XP computer on your network will be an automatic HIPAA violation— which makes you non-compliant with Meaningful Use— and will be a time bomb that could easily cause a reportable and expensive breach of protected patient information. HIPAA fines and loss of Meaningful Use money can far outweigh the expense of replacing your old computers.”

Sound a little drastic?  It doesn’t seem so when you look at Laura Hamilton’s interview with HIPAA attorney James Wieland,

Additive Analytics: Let’s say that a hospital computer is still running Windows XP after the end-of-life (EOL) on April 8. Then a virus compromises the machine, and attackers steal personal health information (PHI). What are the legal ramifications for the healthcare provider?

James: On those facts, it would certainly appear to be a breach, reportable under the HIPAA breach notification rules to the individuals and to the Secretary. Breaches are subject to investigation and may result in penalties.

Hmmm we just found out that there is a major security flaw with Internet Explorer which could lead to a breach and machines running XP will NOT have a fix from Microsoft. What happens when the hacker group that FireEye discovered (or any hacker group) decided to exploit the healthcare side of things?

To me the IE 8 design problem for MLA.net opened my eyes to the greater XP problem within healthcare.

Presidential Priorities

I am starting very early on my priorities as President. I am not yet officially President elect (that happens at this MLA) and the current President elect (soon to be President) Linda Walton has not officially released her priorities. But, ever since I was nominated I have been thinking about my priorities.

As I mentioned I am early to the Presidential priority party, but I want to start early because I think it will take me a while to refine them.

Here is very unofficial rough timeline of the Presidential priorities.

  • President Elect year – Attend MLA Board meetings to get familiar with current issues happening within MLA. Work with the rest of the Board to help the current President and with his/her priorities.  Start thinking of and create my own Presidential priorities and present them to the Board.
  • Presidential year – Present the priorities to the membership and create task forces or have committees assigned to help achieve the priorities.
  • Past Presidential year – The priorities work from the task forces, committees, etc. either wind down or evolve.  With the help of the rest of the Board, work with the task forces or committees as they wind down or evolve.

In a nutshell I have one year to think of my priorities, one year to get them started and see them to their completion or evolution.  In reality not every Presidential priority is able to finish in that timeline.  It would be difficult and unwise to abandon unfinished priorities from previous Presidents. Some priorities can be finished within a year, but others require several years to finish, or they evolve into regular, ongoing MLA activities (committee charges, HQ staff assignments, etc.)

While I am looking at my predecessors’ Presidential priorities I want to also take into account the MLA membership’s thoughts on what my priorities should be.

I am asking MLA members to think about what my Presidential priorities should be as they relate to MLA’s mission.  Please keep in mind, I will also be working on previous priorities AND there is a bit of time crunch unless I go mad with Presidential power and throw the bylaws out the window and declare myself the Monarch of MLA. (Just kidding…but it is a catchy name)

Rome was not built in a day. My ultimate goal, independent of any priority, is to help others and inspire them to be active and work to better MLA and medical librarianship.  I think of it a bit like this…. One snow flake is small and easily melts by itself, but when it is packed in a snowball with other snow flakes as it rolls down a hill, it becomes a stronger force to be dealt with.  I cannot do it alone.

 

Call for Virtual Projects for JMLA Column

(cross posted in a lot of places)

Virtual Projects for JMLA Column by March 15, 2014

The Journal of the Medical Library Association (JMLA) Virtual Projects Committee is seeking innovative and notable projects for the upcoming JMLA Virtual Projects column. The annual column which was launched in October 2013 (http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC3794676/) focuses on library virtual spaces that extend the library “presence” outward to support users in their digital spaces, wherever and whenever needed.

The JMLA welcomes submissions of recent projects for the Virtual Projects column that will be published October 2014. To be considered for this column, please submit a 200 word abstract of your virtual project or a link to your project web page that describes the project and why it is innovative/notable. Send your submissions to Susan Lessick, AHIP, FMLA, [email protected], by MARCH 15, 2014.

Some examples of virtual library projects :

  • projects that demonstrate the integration of evidence and/or digital content and library services into the institution’s Electronic Health Record (EHR) as part of the treatment and care process
  • projects related to providing new technologies, such as libraries providing collections and tools to support 3D printing or offering 3D services (‘makerspaces’)
  • projects that improve the quality of the library’s web presence through the implementation of a new web design, feature, or tool, such as animation, user interactivity or webpage/site builders
  • projects that facilitate information discovery and content delivery (e.g, use of web-scale discovery or knowledge bases)

Please consider sharing your knowledge and experiences with implementing virtual projects in your library to inspire and encourage your peers, partners, and communities!

JMLA Virtual Projects Committee:

Kimberley Barker
Janis Brown, AHIP
Michelle Kraft, AHIP
Susan Lessick, AHIP, FMLA
Eric Schnell
Elizabeth Whipple, AHIP

#Medlibs: Love & Hate in Medical Libraries

(post duplicated on http://medlibschat.blogspot.com/)

One day you are Katrina and the Waves and you are “Walkin’ on Sunshine” everything is good and falling into place.  Your searches are matching up just perfectly with MeSH, patrons are writing thank you emails, the CEO just praised you, and a new project is going like gang busters.  Life in the library is perfect.

BUUUT the next day (or week) you are Joan Jett growling, “I Hate Myself for Loving You” as nothing you do seems to be working.  PubMed keeps crashing, patrons are upset because you can’t get the article from the  Journal of Big Toe Science written in Hindi rushed the same day and translated into English, your budget was cut more than expected, and administration or IT (take your pick) throws cold water all over your pet project.  Life in the library is like a bad relationship.

Like any career, medical librarianship has its ups and downs.  Friday is Valentine’s Day and to get in the spirit the #medlibs Twitter chat group will be having fun discussing our love/hate relationships with medical librarianship.

So grab some wine and chocolate, after all it is the day before Valentine’s Day and curl up with your laptop and chat with us this Thursday 9pm eastern.  Don’t forget to follow the word #medlibs to watch and participate in the discussion.  Lurkers and late arrivals are welcome.  Nikki Dettmar and I will be moderating and we look forward to seeing you online.

For more information or questions tweet @eagledawg or @krafty or drop us an email.